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Estimating Nitrogen Credit from Mnaure

October 05, 2018 | By Rick Koelsch, University of Nebraska Extension |

Manure is a valuable source of nutrients offering agronomic and soil health value. Most manure nutrients (e.g. phosphorus) can be managed successfully with traditional soil analysis.  However, nitrogen in manure requires some simple advance planning to insure that it is given proper credit for offsetting commercial fertilizer inputs.  

Take Home Message: Manure is an environmentally friendly source of nitrogen if used to offset commercial fertilizer nitrogen.


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High Plains Midwest Journal

Building soil organic matter takes time

October 04, 2018 | By Todd Whitney, UNL Extension Educator |

What is a realistic timeline goal for increasing soil organic matter content? Our “instant” culture gravitates to testimonials about how to rapidly increase soil organic matter by 1 percent within one to three years.


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Journal Inquirer

New compost technology helps Enfield farm save on fuel costs

October 03, 2018 | By John Lavenburg |

A pilot project at an Enfield farm is generating heat by composting manure, leading to big savings in fuel consumption, farm and state officials say. The Compost Aeration and Heat Recovery Pilot Project introduced a new system at the farm, the Agrilab Technologies Hot Skid 250R.  It is a plug-and-play unit consisting of the mechanical aeration, heat recovery, plumbing, monitoring, and controlling components.

(Agrilab Technologies is featured in the Newtrient Technology Catalog: Click here)


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Cincinnati Business Courier

Going green isn’t a fad for Ohio dairy farmers

October 02, 2018 | By American Dairy Association Mideast |

Ohio dairy farmers strive to conserve natural resources and minimize the environmental impact in everything they do — from properly managing manure and protecting the rivers and streams to reducing odors and air pollutants. Advanced, modern technologies have allowed dairy farmers across Ohio to work more efficiently while protecting the environment. Today, a gallon of milk is produced with 65 percent less water and 63 percent less carbon than a gallon of milk in 1944.


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